Introducing: OLX Rewards Hide
Forum Search

Anong Halamang Gamot ang Natatandaan Ninyong Ginagamit ng mga matatanda ..........

This topic is locked.
posted September 3, 2011 06:18PM
View First Post Hide First Post
posted September 30, 2011 10:04PM
ajhen99
ajhen99
stars
Veteran Sulitizen
288 posts
  • Registered: Jul 14, 2007
  • Last Access From: Philippines
oregano para sa ubo....yan ang laging naririnig ko sa matatanda mabisa daw talaga..pinangtatapal pa nga yan sa katawan.
Locked | Report Report
posted September 30, 2011 10:16PM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011
  • Last Access From: Thailand

Ito na nga ba ang sinasabi, sa thailand gulay na, sa atin gamot palang, D.

This afternoon, my crew and I, went to Lotus Supermarket, which is identical to SM in Pinas, as usual, we walk around to get the benefit of walking exercise.

Our purpose is to purchase food stuff for the ship. At the veggies section, I was surprised to find a makahiya grass (bashful mimosa) along with other veggies like ampalaya, patula, and cabbage. And it is the whole makahiya plant including its roots. I know makahiya is used as medicine but did not expect to be use as normal veggies.

There are also other green leafy veggies which are not familiar to me. back to makahiya, makahiya is the philippine version of gensing root,  when it comes to its aphrodesiac properties. To this regard, thailand is more knowledgeable in the properties and benefits of makahiya, in the sense, that they are already consuming it as veggies in their diet, whereas, we in Pinas only use it as medicine.

Hehehe, ano kaya ang lasa non.

Another discovery is the availability of most ayurvedic herbal med in their condiments counter. So did bought few bottles for my fresh veggie salads and noddle soup seasoning, they are; coriander leaf powder, turmeric, rosemary, and rosewood.

For the benefit of others who have not yet visit our thread, I have post here makahiya photos and infos.



Read more: http://www.sulit.com.ph/index.php/view+topic/id/87159/My+surprising+Experience+in+Bangkok+Supermarket.
Locked | Report Report
posted September 30, 2011 10:36PM
3rdsheik
3rdsheik
stars
Sulitizen
59 posts
  • Registered: Aug 15, 2011
  • Last Access From: Philippines
I really like this thread.. very informative
Locked | Report Report
posted September 30, 2011 11:32PM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011
  • Last Access From: Thailand
3rdsheik posted on September 30, 2011 10:36PM
I really like this thread.. very informative


Tama, ka dyan, hindi lang sa medicinal aspects niya, kundi sa mga students of all levels, kasi kung gusto nilang makita kung ano ang itsura ng halaman at ang iba pang detalye ng halaman, all they have to do is to click on the plants scientific name and  that's it. Masuwerte sila ngayon, tayo marami tayong hindi nakitang halaman noon, kasi wala pang sulit.com.ph nung nag-aaral tayo, hehehe.

Locked | Report Report
posted October 1, 2011 06:34PM
joms1978
joms1978
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
9882 posts
  • Registered: Jan 24, 2010
  • Last Access From: Philippines
Jayjay728 posted on September 30, 2011 10:16PM

Ito na nga ba ang sinasabi, sa thailand gulay na, sa atin gamot palang, D.

This afternoon, my crew and I, went to Lotus Supermarket, which is identical to SM in Pinas, as usual, we walk around to get the benefit of walking exercise.

Our purpose is to purchase food stuff for the ship. At the veggies section, I was surprised to find a makahiya grass (bashful mimosa) along with other veggies like ampalaya, patula, and cabbage. And it is the whole makahiya plant including its roots. I know makahiya is used as medicine but did not expect to be use as normal veggies.

There are also other green leafy veggies which are not familiar to me. back to makahiya, makahiya is the philippine version of gensing root,  when it comes to its aphrodesiac properties. To this regard, thailand is more knowledgeable in the properties and benefits of makahiya, in the sense, that they are already consuming it as veggies in their diet, whereas, we in Pinas only use it as medicine.

Hehehe, ano kaya ang lasa non.

Another discovery is the availability of most ayurvedic herbal med in their condiments counter. So did bought few bottles for my fresh veggie salads and noddle soup seasoning, they are; coriander leaf powder, turmeric, rosemary, and rosewood.

For the benefit of others who have not yet visit our thread, I have post here makahiya photos and infos.



Read more: http://www.sulit.com.ph/index.php/view+topic/id/87159/My+surprising+Experience+in+Bangkok+Supermarket.


ang galing talaga ni sir Jayjay.. thanks for the information.. 

Locked | Report Report
posted October 1, 2011 11:47PM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011
  • Last Access From: Thailand

@ jhoms, walang sakit eh , hehehe..

Ang ipapakilala naman natin ngayon ang adelfa plants, as anti-cancer  at herpes medicinal plant.

Adelfa
Nerium indicum Mill.
SOUTH SEA ROSE
Chia-chu-t'ao

 

Other scientific names  Common names 
Neroum oleander Blanco   Adelfa (Span., Tag.)  
Nerium odorum Soland. Baladre (Tag.) 
a Ceylon Tree (Engl.) 
  Dog bane (Engl.) 
  Oleander (Engl.) 
  Rose bay (Engl.) 
  South sea rose (Engl.) 
  Chia-chu-t'ao (Chin.)

 

Botany
Erect, smooth shrub, 1.5 to 3 mteters high with a cream-colored sticky resinous juice. Leaves are in whorls of 3 or 4, linear-lanceolate, 10-15 cm long, with numerous horizontal nerves. Flowers are showy, sweet-scented, single or double, 4-5 cm in diameter, white, pink or red, borne in termianl inflorescense (cymes). Fruit is cylindric, paired, with deep linear striations, 15-20 cm long. Seeds are numerous and compressed, with a tuft of fine, shining, white, silky hairs.

Distribution
Cultivated for its flowers; nowwhere established.

Constituents and properties
Glycoside, oleadrin; tannin; volatile oil, 0.25%.
Nerium oleander's leaves contain two principles: neriin and oleandrin, glucosides with properties similar to digitalin.
The seeds contain phytosterin and l-strophnathin. The bark contains toxic glycosides: rosaginin and nerlin, volatile oil, fixed oil.

Nerium odorum's bark yielded two toxic bitter principles–neriodorin and neriodorein. Another toxic principle is karabin. Both karabin and neriodorin are probably resins, rather than glucosides.

Leaves and flowers are considered cardiotonic, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic and expectorant. Whole plant believed to have anticancer properties.

The pharmacologic actions of of neriin and oleandrin resemble those of digitalis glucosides. In human beings, toxicity manifests as nausea, vomiting, colic, decreased appetite, dizziness, drowsiness, bradycardia and irregular heart beats, pupillary dilation, and sometimes unconsciousness attributed to digitalis poisoning.



Parts used and preparation
Bark and leaves.

Uses
Folkloric
- Herpes zoster (skin): Crush leaves, mix with oil and apply on lesions. Do not apply on raw surface. Milky juice of the plant is irritating. Caution: Not to be taken internally.
- Herpes simplex: Mix 1 cup of chopped leaves and bark with 2 tablespoons of oil. Apply to lesions 3 times daily.
- Ringworm: Chop a foot long branch and mix with 1 cup chopped fresh young leaves. Mix the juice with 5 drops of fresh coconut oil. Apply 3 times daily.
- Snake bites: Pound 10 leaves and a piece of branch. Apply poultice to the wound.
- Root, locally and internally, used for abortion.
- Roots, made into paste with water, used for hemorrhoids.
- Roots and bark used externally for eczema, snake bites and as insecticide.
- Fresh leaves applied to tumors to hasten suppuration.
- In traditional Chinese medicine, the flowers and leaves have been used to stimulate the cardiac muscles, relieve pain and eliminate blood stasis.


Studies
- Molluscicidal activity of Nerium indicum bark:
The study showed the bark of Nerium indicum as an important source of botanical molluscicide and is an effective insecticide against Blatta orientalis. Glycosides, steroids and terpenoids were also isolated from Nerium indicum.
• Studies on polysaccharides from the flowers studied for neuro-protective effects.
Primary Metabolites:
Study on the quantification of primary metabolities in N. indicum yielded carbohydrates, proteins, phenols, lipids, etc. N. indicum's stem contains higher levels of phenol which has immuno-modulating, anti-tumour and antibacterial activities.
Tincture Cardiovascular Effect:
Tincture Karveer is a potent cardiotonic drug which is also purported to relieve symptoms of Cor pulmonale as a bronchodilator and cough sedative. The tincture is considered safe and helpful, and promising for the treatment of CHF in humans.
Neuroprotective:
Study of isolated polysaccharides from the flowers of N. indicum (J6) showed potential as a neuroprotective agent against neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease through a mechanism that may primarily rely on inactivation of the JNK signaling pathway.
Polysaccharides / Nerve Growth Factor-like Effect: Study of polysaccharides J1 (a rhamnogalacturonan) and J2 (a xyloglucan) from the whole flowers of N. indicum were tested on the proliferation and differentiation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and found to have nerve growth factor-life effect.
Analgesic:
Study of extract of flowers and roots of N. indicum showed promising antinociceptive activity mediated through the prostaglandin pathways with analgesic principles interfering with the biosynthesis of prostaglandins.
Larvicidal:
Study of larvicidal lethality of extracts of lattices of N indicum and E royleana on Culex quinquefasciatus showed significant delay in embryonic development of Culex larvae.
Antimicrobial / Antifungal: In a study of the ethanolic extracts of dried leaves of N. indicum and Martynia annua, N indicum showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activuty compared to M. annua.
Anti-Angiogenesis:
Study yielded three oligosaccharides. Bioactivity angiogenesis testing showed two of the oligosaccharides significantly inhibited the HMEC-1 cell tube formation.


Availability
Wild-crafted 



Photo © Godofredo Stuart / StuartXchange

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings
(1)
Quantification of Primary Metabolites of Nerium indicum / Rekha Vijayvergia and Jitendra Kumar / Asian J. Exp. Sci., Vol. 21, No. 1, 2007, 123-128
(2)
A Study of Cardiovascular Effects of Tincture Karveer (Nerium indicum) / V P Trivedi et al / References
Pharmaceutical Biology • 1978, Vol. 16, No. 4, Pages 167-175 , DOI 10.3109/13880207809083268
(3)
New polysaccharide from Nerium indicum protects neurons via stress kinase signaling pathway
/ YU Man-Shan et al / Brain research / 2007, vol. 1153, pp. 221-230
(4)
Characterization of a Rhamnogalacturonan and a Xyloglucan from Nerium indicum and Their Activities on PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cells / J. Nat. Prod., 2003, 66 (1), pp 7–10 / DOI: 10.1021/np020118o
(4)
Analgesic Activity of Methanolic Extracts of Nerium indicum Mill.
/ Shafi Uddin Ahmed / Dhaka Univ. J. Pharm. Sci. 5(1-2): 85-87, 2006
(5)
TOXICITY OF NERIUM INDICUM AND EUPHORBIA ROYLEANA LATTICES AGAINST CULEX QUINQUEFASCIATUS MOSQUITO LARVAE / Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine Vol 7 (2003)/
(6)
Comparative AntiMicrobial studies of Ethanolic extract of leaves of Nerium indicum & Martynia annua / N.P.S. Sengar et al / Department of Pharmacy, Barkatullah University, Bhopal (India), Sagar Institute of Research & Technology, Ayodhya by Pass Road, Bhopal, (India)
(7)
New oligosaccharides prepared by acid hydrolysis of the polysaccharides from Nerium indicum Mill and their anti-angiogenesis activities
/ Ke Hu et al / doi:10.1016/j.carres.2008.10.019 / Carbohydrate Research
Volume 344, Issue 2, 26 January 2009, Pages 198-203

Locked | Report Report
posted October 2, 2011 08:54PM
cathygo
cathygo
stars
Elite Sulitizen
700 posts
  • Registered: Sep 25, 2009
  • Last Access From: Philippines
Jayjay728 posted on September 27, 2011 07:57PM
cathygo posted on September 27, 2011 03:09PM

 

ito po.. Pantapal sa tiyan kapag may kabag ako noon hehehe

 


anong halaman ito Cath, mukyang maganda ha, malamig sa mata.


Message appended on September 27, 2011 08:11PM

Continuation of Medicinal Plants:

   Page  3

 

Lanting

Gums swelling

 

Boil the leaves in a glass of water. Filter and gurgle the water when lukewarm or cool.

 

Damong Maria

 

Headache

Ground 5 fresh leaves. Massage it on forehead from side to side, then place it there for 30 minutes.

 

 

Lagundi

 

Headache

Crush 5 leaves and place it on forehead and senses.

 

Sambong

 

Headache

Crush 5 leaves and heat on fire one by one. Place leaf on forehead when lukewarm. Replace the leaf when cold, with another lukewarm leaf, until the 5 leaves were consumed.

Repeat twice a day.

 

Mansanilya

Headache

Crush 5 fresh leaves. Put 2 drops of coco-oil

And heat it on fire. Place it on forehead.

If headache is caused by sinusitis, place it also on a place near the nose. Apply this before bedtime for 30 mins.

 

Kataka-taka

Headache

Crush the leaf and place it directly on forehead for 30 mins.

 

Mayana

 

Headache

If headache is caused by sinusitis.

Heat on fire 10 fresh leaves. Place it on forehead and part of the face near the nose. When leaf is cold, replace it with a newly heated one until all 10 leaves is consumed.

Repeat 2 x D.

 

Atswete

Headache

Heat 7 leaves on fire. Wet it with oil and place it on forehead. Keep it on forehead with a piece of cloth or hankerchief.

 

Bawang

Headache

Crush 2 cloves and massage in cicular direction on both sides of the forehead.

 

Bawang

High blood press.

Eat 3-4 cloves every meal, It should be cook before eating, and to keep on eating daily while hbp is present.

Fresh garlic leaves can also be taken.

Avoid taking garlic if you have an ulcer.

 

Kintsay

High blood press.

Eat raw kintsay leaves and trunk/stem daily.

 

 

 

Kalatsutsi

Itchy Skin

 

Mix coco-oil (1 tbsp) with 8 drops of milky-juice (from broken branch). Apply on itchy skin.

Do not apply on wounded skin or cuts.

 

Bawang

Insect Bite

Slice the clove lengthwise and place it on insect bites.

 

Eucalyptus

Insect,

to drive away

Burn the dried leaves and let burn and smoke continuously.

 

Dalandan

Kabag

Boil ½ cup of orange skin in a cup of water for 15 mins. Drink the water lukewarm.

 

Ikmo

Kabag

 

 

Wipe with oil some leaves and heat it on fire.

Apply while lukewarm over the stomach.

Balimbing

Lagnat

Ground fresh leaves and boil for 10 minutes, then cool it off.

Use as cold compress on the forehead with a towel.

 

Lagundi

Lagnat

         (fever)

Boil half cup of grounded fresh lagundi leaves in two glasses of water for 16 minutes. Drink the water accordingly:

2-5 years old – 1 tbsp every 4 hours.

6-12 y.o.       -  half  cup every 4 hours.

Adult            -  1 cup every 4 hrs.

 

Lantana or

           Katuray

Lagnat

         (fever)

Boil a piece of bark of the tree for 15 mins. or dip few clean leaves in a newly boiled water for 30 mins. Filter and drink as tea. 4 x D.

 

Okra

Lagnat/fever

Roast and ground half cup of okra seed. Boil it in 2 glasses of water for 16 minutes and cool it off.

 

2-5 years old – ¼ cup, 3 x a day after meal.

6-12 y.o.       -  ½ cup, 3 x a day after meal.

Adult            -  1  cup, 3 x a day after meal.

 


naitatapal sa tiyan, bago itapal itatapat mo muna yung dahonng tuba sa apoy or kandila tapos kapag medyo mainit na at may lumabas na oil sa dahon tsaka maitatapal. pero yung hindi naman masyado mainit at baka naman mapaso ang paglalagyan =)

May bunga yung puno ng tuba, pero hindi nakakain, nakakalason yun.

Locked | Report Report
posted October 2, 2011 08:56PM
orchardtechnology
orchardtechnology
stars
Elite Sulitizen
727 posts
  • Registered: Nov 21, 2007
  • Last Access From: Philippines
yung duhat para sa diabetic
Locked | Report Report
posted October 2, 2011 08:58PM
cathygo
cathygo
stars
Elite Sulitizen
700 posts
  • Registered: Sep 25, 2009
  • Last Access From: Philippines
businessonline247 posted on September 28, 2011 12:05AM
Jayjay728 posted on September 27, 2011 07:57PM
cathygo posted on September 27, 2011 03:09PM

 

ito po.. Pantapal sa tiyan kapag may kabag ako noon hehehe

 


anong halaman ito Cath, mukyang maganda ha, malamig sa mata.


Message appended on September 27, 2011 08:11PM

Continuation of Medicinal Plants:

   Page  3

 

Lanting

Gums swelling

 

Boil the leaves in a glass of water. Filter and gurgle the water when lukewarm or cool.

 

Damong Maria

 

Headache

Ground 5 fresh leaves. Massage it on forehead from side to side, then place it there for 30 minutes.

 

 

Lagundi

 

Headache

Crush 5 leaves and place it on forehead and senses.

 

Sambong

 

Headache

Crush 5 leaves and heat on fire one by one. Place leaf on forehead when lukewarm. Replace the leaf when cold, with another lukewarm leaf, until the 5 leaves were consumed.

Repeat twice a day.

 

Mansanilya

Headache

Crush 5 fresh leaves. Put 2 drops of coco-oil

And heat it on fire. Place it on forehead.

If headache is caused by sinusitis, place it also on a place near the nose. Apply this before bedtime for 30 mins.

 

Kataka-taka

Headache

Crush the leaf and place it directly on forehead for 30 mins.

 

Mayana

 

Headache

If headache is caused by sinusitis.

Heat on fire 10 fresh leaves. Place it on forehead and part of the face near the nose. When leaf is cold, replace it with a newly heated one until all 10 leaves is consumed.

Repeat 2 x D.

 

Atswete

Headache

Heat 7 leaves on fire. Wet it with oil and place it on forehead. Keep it on forehead with a piece of cloth or hankerchief.

 

Bawang

Headache

Crush 2 cloves and massage in cicular direction on both sides of the forehead.

 

Bawang

High blood press.

Eat 3-4 cloves every meal, It should be cook before eating, and to keep on eating daily while hbp is present.

Fresh garlic leaves can also be taken.

Avoid taking garlic if you have an ulcer.

 

Kintsay

High blood press.

Eat raw kintsay leaves and trunk/stem daily.

 

 

 

Kalatsutsi

Itchy Skin

 

Mix coco-oil (1 tbsp) with 8 drops of milky-juice (from broken branch). Apply on itchy skin.

Do not apply on wounded skin or cuts.

 

Bawang

Insect Bite

Slice the clove lengthwise and place it on insect bites.

 

Eucalyptus

Insect,

to drive away

Burn the dried leaves and let burn and smoke continuously.

 

Dalandan

Kabag

Boil ½ cup of orange skin in a cup of water for 15 mins. Drink the water lukewarm.

 

Ikmo

Kabag

 

 

Wipe with oil some leaves and heat it on fire.

Apply while lukewarm over the stomach.

Balimbing

Lagnat

Ground fresh leaves and boil for 10 minutes, then cool it off.

Use as cold compress on the forehead with a towel.

 

Lagundi

Lagnat

         (fever)

Boil half cup of grounded fresh lagundi leaves in two glasses of water for 16 minutes. Drink the water accordingly:

2-5 years old – 1 tbsp every 4 hours.

6-12 y.o.       -  half  cup every 4 hours.

Adult            -  1 cup every 4 hrs.

 

Lantana or

           Katuray

Lagnat

         (fever)

Boil a piece of bark of the tree for 15 mins. or dip few clean leaves in a newly boiled water for 30 mins. Filter and drink as tea. 4 x D.

 

Okra

Lagnat/fever

Roast and ground half cup of okra seed. Boil it in 2 glasses of water for 16 minutes and cool it off.

 

2-5 years old – ¼ cup, 3 x a day after meal.

6-12 y.o.       -  ½ cup, 3 x a day after meal.

Adult            -  1  cup, 3 x a day after meal.

 

@cathygo : dahon ata ng tuba yan..epektib ung dahon nyan pero deadly ung bunga!ginagamit ung bunga nyan sa pag-gawa ng katol!effective din yan maging insect repellant! :)

 

@jayjay726: ok ung mga nakapost na halamang gamot dito ah!nakalagay na sa pader ko ung page1-4! :)


dahon nga ng tuba.

 

tama, nakakalason yung bunga nito kaya yung kapit bahay namin pinutol kasi may mga bata na naka expose at baka makain.

 

na experience ko talaga na iyan ang naitatapal ng nanay ko noon kapag masakit ang tiyan namin magkakapatid.. hehehe

 

effective yan kaso bihira ng makakita niyan sa ngayon.. 

Locked | Report Report
posted October 2, 2011 09:00PM
orchardtechnology
orchardtechnology
stars
Elite Sulitizen
727 posts
  • Registered: Nov 21, 2007
  • Last Access From: Philippines

bignay bark parang pampalakas pagtalik yung epekto raw sabi ng matatanda. binebenta ito sa may raon

Locked | Report Report
posted October 2, 2011 09:29PM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011
  • Last Access From: Thailand

@ cath - ang galing din pala nyang tuba, mayroon din tayo nyan dito at ipapakilala natin isia-isa.

@ orchardtechnology - thanks sa bignay mo, yan pala yong sa ingles na currant, lagi ko nga nakikita yan sa ayurvedic medicine. kukuha rin ako nyan, along the way yang pampaga kapag pupunta ako ng laoag, saan ba malapit ang lugar nyo at saan ang exit, angeles o dao, thanks

ang ipapakilala naman natin ang ang anis na madalas na hinahalo sa kakanin o biko,

Haras

Anis
Foeniculum vulgare
FENNEL
Hsiao-hui

Other scientific names Common names
Anethum foeniculum Anis (Span., tag.) 
  Haras (Tag.) 
  Hsiao-hui (Chin.)
  Fennel (Engl.)

 

 

General info
Raw fennel has a pronounced and distinct taste, close to anise or licorice. In olden times, fennel has been used both as an appetite suppressant and digestive aid, to counter witchcraft, as a culinary garnish, and varied medicinal uses.

Botany
Haras is a biennial plant with a thick rootstock, erect, much-branched, smooth, often 1 meter or more in height. Leaves are 2-, 3-, or 4-pinnate and about 20 cm long; the segments are filiform and 2 to 4 cm long. Umbels are 5 to 10 cm in diameter; the rays number 8 to 15, about 2 to 3 cm long, but longer in each fruit, each with 20 to 30, pedicelled, yellow flowers. Fruit is ridged, very aromatic, oblong or ellipsoid, about 5 mm long. Seeds are somewhat dorsally compressed.

Distribution
Cultivated.

Nowhere spontaneous.

Properties
• Considered analgesic, anti-inflammatory, aromatic, emmenagogue, expectorant, hallucinogenic, stomachic.
• Warming, carminative, stomachic, antispasmodic, antidepressant, a weak diuretic, and a mild stimulant, galactagogue.

Constituents
• Fruit-volatile oil, 2.9% - 6%, 50 to 60 percent of which is anethol; fixed oil, 8.9%; pectin, 1.3%; pentosan, 5.12%.
• The oil of fennel includes 50 - 60% nethol, also the chief constituent of anise oil and 18-22 percent fenchone. (Rodale's Encyclopedia of Herbs)
• Infused fruit considered carminative.
• Roots considered aperative and purgative.
• Shoots of young plants considered carminative and respiratory.
• Considered energizing, tranquilizing and anti-spasmodic.

Parts used
Whole plant, roots, seeds, oil of seed.

Uses
Culinary
The fruit, seeds and young leaves are used for flavoring sweets, dishes and dainties.
The young leaves, raw or cooked, used as flavoring.
The seeds have an anise-like flavor.
Folkloric
Crushed fruit is inhaled to counter faintness.
Infusion of fruit used for flatulence.
Used as diuretic and emmenagogue.
Juice of fruit used to improve eyesight.
Decoction is gargled as a breath freshener or applied as an eyewash.
Decoction of seeds help regulate menses.
Poultice has been used to relieve breast swelling in nursing mothers.
Infusion of seeds used for stomatitis, abdominal cramps, colic, flatulence.
Fennel water (aqua foeniculi) used for colic and flatulence in children.
Hot infusion of fruit used for amenorrhea and suppressed lacteal secretion.
Infusion of roots given for toothaches and postpartum pains.
Hot infusion of roots given for amenorrhea
Infusion of seeds used for flatulence in babies.
Infusion of root used for urinary disorders.
Oil used for flatulence.
Oil of seeds used for intestinal deworming in 3-4 ml doses.
Paste of seeds or fruit used in cooling drinks for fevers.
Also used for increasing breast milk production, easing childbirth, soothing cough.
Used to enhance libido.
An ingredient of "gripe water" used for infantile colic.
In Madras, fruits used for venereal diseases.
In Mexico, decoction is used as galactagogue.
In Antilles, used as a stimulant.
Cosmetic
I
nfusion of ground seeds as a steam facial.
Mouthwash.
Toothpaste.
Used in skin-care products.
Anticellulite massage oil: In a dark bottle, 8 drops of fennel, 8 drops of juniper, 10 drops of grapefruit, 5 tsps of sweet almond oil and 5 drops of jojoba oil; massage to affected area daily.
(Illustrated Encyclopedia of Natural Remedies: C. Norman Shealy, MD)
Others
Insect repellent.
Crushed leaves used for dog fleas.

Studies
Repellent:
Mosquito repellent isolated from Foeniculum vulgare fruit: The fennel oil and E-9-octadecenoic acide are used as insect repellent components due to its lack of human toxicity.
Anti-Infantile Colic: The effect of fennel (Foeniculum Vulgare) seed oil emulsion in infantile colic: a randomized, placebo-controlled study: Fennel seed oil has been shown to reduce intestinal spasms and increase small intestinal motility – Study on fennel seed emulsion was superior to placebo in decreasing intensity of infantile colic.
Bronchodilator Effect: Relaxant effect of Foeniculum vulgare on isolated Guinea pig tracheal chains: Study showed bronchodilator effects of the ethanol extract and essential oil from FV.
Hepatoprotective: (1) Investigation of Hepatoprotective Effect of Foeniculum vulgare Fixed Oil in Rats: The study indicates that FV fixed oil has a potential hepatoprotective action against induced liver fibrosis in rats.
(2) Study showed Fv essential oil has a potent hepatoprotective action against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage in rats.
Anti-Dysmenorrhea: Study results suggest Foeniculum vulgare extract can be effective in reducing the severity of dysmenorrhea.
Oculohypotensive Activity : Aqueous extract of Fv possess significant oculohypotensive activity, comparable to timolol. Further studies are warranted before Fv finds its place in the arsenal of antiglaucoma drugs.
Leaf and Seed Comparison: Results of analysis of leaves and seeds of Fv showed the leaves contained higher concentrations of fat and flavonoids whereas the seeds were higher in saponins, protein, amino acids and other organic compounds.
Antioxidant: The antioxidant potential of the herb might explain some of its empirical uses in folk medicine. The study found the shoots to have the highest radical-scavengiing activity and lipid-peroxidation capacity in agreement with the highest phenolic and ascorbic acid contents in this part. The shoots also showed a high concentration of tocopherols and were the only part plants found to have flavonoids.

Anti-Hirsutism / Toxicity Studies: Study found the fennel extract to be safe with no adverse effect in topical application and presents as a treatment of hirsutism.The efficacy of treatment with cream containing 2% fennel is better than 1% fennel cream.

Preparation of infusion
Infusion: Pour a cup of boiling water into 1-2 tsp of crushed seeds; cover and infuse for 10 minutes. For flatulence, take a cup, half an hour before meals.

Availability
Wildcrafted. 
Capsules, fennel oil, capsules or teas in the cybermarket.


View message logs
Locked | Report Report
posted October 5, 2011 06:35PM
joms1978
joms1978
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
9882 posts
  • Registered: Jan 24, 2010
  • Last Access From: Philippines
dahon ng bayabas panlinis sa sugat.. tuyong dahon ng saging recovery ng sugat..
Locked | Report Report
posted October 10, 2011 12:21AM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011

Napili kung i-feature ang pipino dahil malamang bumenta ito sa mga kababaihan dahil sa whitenning properties nya at iba pa, at dapat rin nating malaman na wag tinatanggal ang buto, dahil ang buto ay may essential oil na may aprhodesiac properties, may lutein para hindi agad lumabo ang paningin o ng mata. At magaling din siyang antioxidant.

 

Family • Cucurbitaceae
Pipino
Cucumis sativus
CUCUMBER

Hu gua

Scientific names  Common names 
Cucumis sativus Linn. Kalabaga (Bis.) 
  Kasimun (Bon.) 
  Maras (Sul.)
  Madas (Sul.) 
  Pepino (Span., Tag.) 
  Pipino (Tag., Ilk.) 
  Cucumber (Engl.)
  Huang gua (Chin.)

Botany
Pipino is an annual, fleshy, climbing vine. Leaves are ovate, 8 to 14 centimeters long, 5-angled or 5-lobed, the lobes or angles being pointed, and hispidious on both surfaces. Flowers are yellow and bell-shaped, axillary, solitary, stalkless or short-stalked. Male and female flowers are similar in color and size, yellow, and about 2 centimeters long. Fruit is usually cylindric, 10 to 20 centimeters long, smooth, yellow when mature, and slightly tuberculated. A variety is smaller and greenish. Seeds are numerous, oblong, compressed, and smooth.

Distribution
- Cultivated in the Philippines.

Constituents
- Fruit contains dextrose (0.11 to 0.98%); saccharose (0.05 to 0.13%); fixed oil (0.11-0.98%).
- Seed contains fixed oil (Gurken oil) 25% consisting of oleic acid (58%), linolic acid (3.7%), palmitic acid (6.8%), stearic acid (3.7%); phytine; and lecithine.
- Aerial parts contain a 14a-methyl D-phytosterol.
- Pulp yields shikimate dehydrogenase.
- Leaves contain urea and an alkaloid, hypoxanthine.
- Study yielded two new megastignmanes from the leaves of C sativus - cucumegastigmanes I and II with other known compounds.

Properties
- Seeds are antihelminthic; also, cooling, diuretic, and strenghtening.
- Active ingredient of the essential oil is considered aphrodisiac in nature.
- Shikimate dehydrogenase from the pulp is considered a facial skin softener; also cooling and a natural sunscreen.


Parts used
Fruit, seeds.

Uses
Edibility / Nutritional
- Peeled raw fruit is peeled, sliced thin, served with vinegar, sugar, salt, pepper and calamansi makes a good vegetable side dish.
- Common salad ingredient; also boiled in stew dishes.
- Seed kernel is edible.
- A variety is used for making pickles.
- In Malaya, young leaves are eaten raw or steamed.
- Good source of calcium and iron, vitamins B and C.
Folkloric
- Juice of leaves used as an emetic in acute indigestion in children .
- Bruised root applied to swelling from the wound of hedgehig quill.
- Raw cucumbers used for dysentery.
- Cucumber salve used for scalds and burns.
- Seeds used as taeniacide (1 - 2 oz of seed thoroughly ground, with sugar, taken fasting, followed in 1-2 hours with a purge).
- In Indo-China, immature fruit given to children for dysentery.
- In India, used as diuretic and for throat infections. Pulp considered healing and soothing, used to keep facial skin soft; is toning and soothing on damage skin and provides a natural sunscreen.

- In Bangladesh, fruit used with cumin seeds for throat infections.
Others
- Cosmetic: rubbing fruit over skin for softness and whiteness.
- Cooling and beautifying to the skin.
- Used in the manufacture of cucumber soap.
- Cucumber scent, one of a few others, linked to female sexual arousal.
source

Studies
Phytochemicals / C-Glycosides: Study yielded the following C-glycosides from the leaves: isovitexin 2″-O-glucoside, isovitexin, isoorientin, 4′-X-O-diglucosides of isovitexin and swertiajaponin. Flowers yielded kaempferol 3-O-rhamnoside and 3-O-glycosides of kaempferol, quercetin, isoramnetin was revealed.
Hypoglycemic / Anti-Diabetes:
(1) In Mexico, one of the edible plants with hypoglycemic activity. (2) Antihyperglycemic effect of 12 edible plants was studied in healthy rabbits. Cucumis sativus significantly decreased the area under the glucose tolerance curve and the hyperglycemic peak. Study suggests the integration of a diet that includes edible plants with hypoglycemic activity
Anthelmintic:
Ethanolic extract of C sativus exhibited a potent activity against tapeworms comparable to the effect of piperazine citrate.
Skin Whitening :
Six plants parts of C sativus were studied for its inhibitory effect on melanogenesis. Leaves and stems showed inhibition of melanin production. Of 8 compounds isolated, lutein was a potentially skin whitening component.
Hepatoprotective / Antioxidant:
Studies have isolated isovitexin and isoorientin, two C-glycosylflavones. Isoorientin has exhibited hepatoprotective effect and isovitexin, an antioxidant effect.


Availability
Small or large scale commercial production. 

Locked | Report Report
posted October 10, 2011 12:26AM
bandwagon
bandwagon
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
11888 posts
  • Registered: Apr 14, 2007
  • Last Access From: Philippines
Jayjay728 posted on September 3, 2011 06:18PM

May mga natatandaan pa ba kayo sa mga halamang gamot na ginagamit ng mga matatanda. Puede n'yong i-post sa thread na ito;

Umpisahan ko na:

Noong Bata pa ako, madalas na ipayo ng Lola ko ay ang mga ito:

Ubo - Isang tasa ng dahon ng sampalok ang pinakukuluan ng lola ko sa dalawang tasa ng tubig, mga 16 minutes of boiling. Then iniinom ito 3 times a day.

Sakit ng Ngipin - Dinikdik na isang butil (clove) na bawang ang paborito ng lola ko, at ipinapasok ito sa butas ng ngipin na sumasakit. 2 times a day ang paglalagay nito.

Sakit ng tiyan - Salabat o pinakuluang luya ang madalas ipayo ng mga matatanda. Iang putol ng dinikdik na luya ang pinakukuluan sa isang tasang tubig for 16 minutes. Then salabat na siya. Inumin ng medyo mainit-init pa o maligamgam.

 

May karugtong.

 

 


mung bata ako, kapag bakasyon ko sa Mindoro, may halamang gamot sa bakuran ng lolo ko na laging nahihingi ng mga kapitbahay. Mam-in ang tawag sa halaman, at ang dahon nito ay gamit panggamot sa sakit ng tiyan at ulo.

 

Locked | Report Report
posted October 10, 2011 12:35AM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011
  • Last Access From: Philippines

Ano ang itsura ng dahon nyan bro, at may bunga ba yan o dahon lang talaga.

 

Guyabano Health Benefits – It Cures Cancer?



Guyabano
/ soursop/ guayabano/ graviolla has the following health benefits according to Bureau of Plant Industry:

Analyses of the flesh of the fruit show that it is deficient in calcium and phosphorus. According to Jansen and Donath it is deficient in vitamin A. Hermano and Sepulveda, however, report that it is an excellent source of vitamins B and C. Prinsan-Geerlings reports that the flesh of the fruit contains saccharose 2.53%, dextrose 5.05% and levulose 0.04 %.

The bark was studied by Greshoff who isolated and amorphous alkaloid, soluble in sodium or potassium hydroxide, but Ridley and Daruty is astringent, and is used in powdered form in diarrhea and dysentery. Kirtikar and Basu and Nadkarni say that it is much used as tonic by the Malays and Chinese. The fruit is used as an anthelmintic, and the unripe and dried fruit, also astringent, is used in diarrhea, among the Amerindians. With sugar, the pulp is refreshing, and is prescribed for diarrhea in Guiana, Antilles andReunion. Tavera reports the roots are used by Amerindians to treat epilepsy.

I am not done yet. There are more!

1. The fruit is claimed to be a miraculous natural cancer cell killer 10,000 times stronger than chemotherapy. It has anti tumor effect and a proven remedy to all types of cancer.

2. A potent antimicrobial agent for both bacterial and fungal infections, is effective against internal parasites and worms, lowers high blood pressure and is used for depression, stress and nervous disorders.

3. It protects your immune system and helps avoid deadly infections.

Are you not tire of reading? Find out more.

—> updates:

Jessica Soho of GMA-7 reported stories of three cancer survivors.



View message logs
Locked | Report Report
posted October 17, 2011 12:31PM
murangbahaylupa
murangbahaylupa
stars
Ultimate Sulitizen
2402 posts
  • Registered: May 10, 2011
ang tuba leaves, pwede pantanggal ng lamig or pilay....
bayabas dahon, panlangas ng sugat
oregano, lagundi para sa ubo

pero ang makahiya now ko lang nalaman na pwde din iconsume....

akala ko damo lang yun
Locked | Report Report
posted October 17, 2011 01:21PM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011
  • Last Access From: Taiwan

Lanzones - Balat pa lang gamot na.

 

Studies
Anti-Malarial: (1) Lansium domesticum: skin and leaf extracts of this fruit tree interrupt the lifecycle of Plasmodium falciparum, and are active towards a chloroquine-resistant strain of the parasite (T9) in vitro: Study indicates extracts of LD are a potential source for compounds with activity against chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falcifarum. (2) Study yielded firve tetratriterpenoids – domesticulide A-E from the seeds of Lansium domesticum together with 11 known triterpenoids. Eight of the compounds showed antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falcifarum.
Antioxidant: Extract of LD has shown to have antioxidant activity against DPPH free radical and anti-tyrosinase activity.
Skin Moisturizing / Lightening Effect: Study showed LD extract can significantly increase skin moisture and decrease the skin melanin index.
Antimelanogenesis: LD methanol extract was one of the study extracts that showed strong inhibition of melanin production of B16 melanoma cells without sginificant cytotoxicity, presenting as a potential ingredient for skin-whitening cosmetics if their safety can be confirmed.
Antibacterial: The air-dried fruit peel of LD yielded five onoceroid triterpenes; the air-dried seeds yielded one onoceroid triterpene (lansionic acid) and germacrene D. Studies of the compounds showed varying degrees of activity against P. aeruginosa, B subtilis, C albicans, A niger among others.
Anti-Skin Tumor: Study isolated a new cycloartanoid triterpene from the leaves of LD. Some of the natural product derivaties show significant inhibitory activity on skin-tumor promotion on the basis of Epstein Barr virus activation.
Onoceramoid Triterpenes / Cytotoxicity: Study isolated three new natural onoceranoid triterpenes from the fruit peel of LD together with two known triterpenoids. The triterpenoids exhibited mild toxicity against brine shrimp (Artemia salina).
Onoceranoid-type Triterpenoids / Antibacterial: Study yielded a rare class of onoceranoid-type triterpenoids, lamesticumin a, lamesticumins B-F, lansic acid 3-ethyl ester and ethyl lansiolate and four known analogues from the twigs of LD. Compounds 1-9 exhibited moderate antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria.

Folkloric
- Decoction of bark and leaves used for dysentery.
- Peel, rich in oleoresin, used for diarrhea and intestinal spasms.
- Crushed seeds used for fevers.
- Astringent bark used for dysentery and malaria.
- Powdered bark used for scorpion stings.
- Bark resin used for flatulence and gastrointestinal colic, for swellings, and as antispasmodic.
- Grounded seeds mixed with water as vermifuge and antipyretic.
- Tincture prepared from the dried rind used for diarrhea and abdominal colic.
- In Indonesia, used for malaria




Message appended on October 17, 2011 01:22PM
www.stuartxchange.com

View message logs
Locked | Report Report
posted October 23, 2011 04:24PM
ecalmonte
ecalmonte
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
10714 posts
  • Registered: Jan 19, 2010
  • Last Access From: Philippines
There are around 1, 500 medicinal herbs being documented in the country. Ten of these are already approved by the Department of Health (DOH). Philippine Herbal Medicine enlisted the ten (10) medicinal plants endorsed by the DOH through its "Traditional Health Program". All ten (10) herbs have been thoroughly tested and have been clinically proven to have medicinal value in the relief and treatment of various ailments.
  1. Akapulko (Cassia alata) - also known as "bayabas-bayabasan" and "ringworm bush" in English. This herbal medicine is used to treat ringworms and skin fungal infections.
  2. Ampalaya (Momordica charantia) - known as "bitter gourd" or "bitter melon" in English, it most known as a treatment of diabetes (diabetes mellitus), for the non-insulin dependent patients.
  3. Bawang (Allium sativum) - popularly known as "garlic", it mainly reduces cholesterol in the blood and as a result, helps control blood pressure.
  4. Bayabas (Psidium guajava) - "guava" in English. It is primarily used as an antiseptic, to disinfect wounds. Also, it can be used as a mouth wash to treat tooth decay and gum infection.
  5. Lagundi (Vitex negundo) - known in English as the "5-leaved chaste tree". It's main use is for the relief of coughs and asthma.
  6. Niyog-niyogan (Quisqualis indica L.) - is a vine known as "Chinese honeysuckle". It is effective in the elimination of intestinal worms, particularly the Ascaris and Trichina. Only the dried matured seeds are medicinal. Crack and ingest the dried seeds two hours after eating (5 to 7 seeds for children & 8 to 10 seeds for adults). If one dose does not eliminate the worms, wait a week before repeating the dose.
  7. Sambong (Blumea balsamifera) - English name: Blumea camphora. A diuretic that helps in the excretion of urinary stones. It can also be used as an edema.
  8. Tsaang Gubat (Ehretia microphylla Lam.) - Prepared like tea, this herbal medicine is effective in treating intestinal motility and also used as a mouth wash since the leaves of this shrub has high fluoride content.
  9. Ulasimang Bato | Pansit-Pansitan (Peperomia pellucida) - It is effective in fighting arthritis and gout. The leaves can be eaten fresh (about a cupful) as salad or like tea. For the decoction, boil a cup of clean chopped leaves in 2 cups of water. Boil for 15 to 20 minutes. Strain, let cool and drink a cup after meals (3 times day).
  10. Yerba Buena (Clinopodium douglasii) - commonly known as Peppermint, this vine is used as an analgesic to relive body aches and pain. It can be taken internally as a decoction or externally by pounding the leaves and applied directly on the afflicted area.
Locked | Report Report
posted October 23, 2011 05:19PM
Jayjay728
Jayjay728
stars
Majestic Sulitizen
7931 posts
  • Registered: Mar 22, 2011
  • Last Access From: Vietnam
Yes tama yan, kaya kung marunong tayong gumamit nito, ay malaking matitipid natin sa gamot.


Message appended on October 23, 2011 05:27PM

 

 

Guava or Bayabas

 

 
 
Bayabas is found throughout the Philippines in all islands and provinces and is usually very common in thickets and secondary forest at low altitudes, ascending to at least 1, 500 meters. Also known as bayawas (Aklanon), guava (English).
 
This plant, which is somewhat hairy reaches a height of 8 meters. The young branches are 4-angled. The leaves are opposite, oblong to elliptic, and 5 to 12 centimeters long, the apex, being pointed and the base usually rounded. The peduncles are 1 to 3 flowered. The flowers are white, 3 to 3.5 centimeters across, solitary or two to three together. The fruit is rounded, ovoid 4 to 9 centimeters long, and green, but yellowish when ripe, and contains many seeds embedded in aromatic, pink, edible pulp.
 
Bayabas is one of the commonest and the best known fruits in the Philippines. A wild tree, it grows abundantly in settled areas. The fruit is a favorite with the Filipinos and is extensively used in the manufacture of jellies owing to the presence of a considerable amount of pectin. The ripe fruit is eaten as a vegetable and used as seasoning for sinigang.
 
Widely distributed in the Philippines. Common in backyards. Well-known because of its edible fruit. Propagation by seeds, budding, grafting, and marcotting. Root cuttings have been tried with success.
 
Leaves used for wounds and toothache must always be fresh. Decoction or infusion of fresh leaves used for wound cleaning to prevent infection and to facilitate healing. Bayabas twigs, chewed at the ends until frayed, used as alternative for toothbrushing with whitening effect.
 
 

View message logs
Locked | Report Report
posted October 23, 2011 06:18PM
great2find
great2find
stars
Majestic2 Sulitizen
21759 posts
  • Registered: Oct 9, 2007
  • Last Access From: Philippines
#18 Poster (All Time)
ecalmonte posted on October 23, 2011 04:24PM
There are around 1, 500 medicinal herbs being documented in the country. Ten of these are already approved by the Department of Health (DOH). Philippine Herbal Medicine enlisted the ten (10) medicinal plants endorsed by the DOH through its "Traditional Health Program". All ten (10) herbs have been thoroughly tested and have been clinically proven to have medicinal value in the relief and treatment of various ailments.
  1. Akapulko (Cassia alata) - also known as "bayabas-bayabasan" and "ringworm bush" in English. This herbal medicine is used to treat ringworms and skin fungal infections.
  2. Ampalaya (Momordica charantia) - known as "bitter gourd" or "bitter melon" in English, it most known as a treatment of diabetes (diabetes mellitus), for the non-insulin dependent patients.
  3. Bawang (Allium sativum) - popularly known as "garlic", it mainly reduces cholesterol in the blood and as a result, helps control blood pressure.
  4. Bayabas (Psidium guajava) - "guava" in English. It is primarily used as an antiseptic, to disinfect wounds. Also, it can be used as a mouth wash to treat tooth decay and gum infection.
  5. Lagundi (Vitex negundo) - known in English as the "5-leaved chaste tree". It's main use is for the relief of coughs and asthma.
  6. Niyog-niyogan (Quisqualis indica L.) - is a vine known as "Chinese honeysuckle". It is effective in the elimination of intestinal worms, particularly the Ascaris and Trichina. Only the dried matured seeds are medicinal. Crack and ingest the dried seeds two hours after eating (5 to 7 seeds for children & 8 to 10 seeds for adults). If one dose does not eliminate the worms, wait a week before repeating the dose.
  7. Sambong (Blumea balsamifera) - English name: Blumea camphora. A diuretic that helps in the excretion of urinary stones. It can also be used as an edema.
  8. Tsaang Gubat (Ehretia microphylla Lam.) - Prepared like tea, this herbal medicine is effective in treating intestinal motility and also used as a mouth wash since the leaves of this shrub has high fluoride content.
  9. Ulasimang Bato | Pansit-Pansitan (Peperomia pellucida) - It is effective in fighting arthritis and gout. The leaves can be eaten fresh (about a cupful) as salad or like tea. For the decoction, boil a cup of clean chopped leaves in 2 cups of water. Boil for 15 to 20 minutes. Strain, let cool and drink a cup after meals (3 times day).
  10. Yerba Buena (Clinopodium douglasii) - commonly known as Peppermint, this vine is used as an analgesic to relive body aches and pain. It can be taken internally as a decoction or externally by pounding the leaves and applied directly on the afflicted area.


Woh! out of thousands 10 pa lang ang approved? di pa nga kasama ang tawa tawa...... 

Locked | Report Report
Back to top ▲
Need help?